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Why June 19, 1865 is important as part of the most significant event in African-American history

I’d like to explain the context of 1865, the most important year in African-American history from my book Road to Ratification: How 27 States Tackled the Most Challenging Issue in American History. The Civil War took place concurrently with the French-Mexican War of 1861-67, with cotton at the root of both. Had the French succeeded […]

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Protecting libraries as vital to democracy

http://attn.com/stories/16444/ivanka-trumps-tweet-about-libraries-backfired Listen to Wisconsin’s voters, Paul Ryan The Hill, April 14, 2017 http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/economy-budget/328860-paul-ryan-listen-to-your-voters-they-value-their-libraries John William Templeton, author of Road to Ratification: How 27 States Tackled the Most Challenging Issue in American History, gave a National Library Week defense of the nation’s libraries on Wisconsin Public Radio’s Joy Cardin Show on Take Action for Libraries Day.  A frequent contributor to The Hill, Templeton said […]

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ReLoading Black San Francisco April 2

The annual meeting of the San Francisco African-American Historical and Cultural Society on Sunday, April 2, 2017 at 2 p.m. at 762 Fulton St. on the second floor of the African-American Art & Culture Complex will host a panel–ReLoading Black San Francisco. John William Templeton, author of Our10Plan, the African-American economic strategy, co-founder of National […]

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Low Country Blues sermon on Sept. 20

Ruling Elder John William Templeton, former commissioner to the Synod of the Pacific, gives a sermon “Low Country Blues” Sept. 20 at St. John’s Presbyterian Church, 25 Lake St. in San Francisco during the morning service at 10 a.m. Templeton, a fourth generation Presbyterian elder, will relate the covenant of his family’s participation in the […]

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AERA15: California African American Freedom Trail: Belonging as a Prerequisite for Success

Presidential Session Hidden Histories and Cultural Preservation from the Ground Up American Educational Research Association 2015 Chicago John William Templeton President Venturata Economic Development Corp. @2015 VEDC California students are never told about the black millionaire captain who financed the Mexican War for the U.S. side, welcomed the victorious commanders at his home, started the […]

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Learn about the most important event in black history

National Black Business Month co-founder John William Templeton shows how the most important event in black history is a launching pad for educational and career achievement throughout 2015. The Oxford University Press historian created the West’s first African-American Freedom Trail in conjunction with the National Park Service, State Office of Historic Preservation and San Francisco […]

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Walking with the King Jan. 17, 18, 19

SFSOUL Shuttle’s special Walking With the King tours of the African-American Freedom Trail, recommended by the State Office of Historic Preservation and San Francisco Travel, Saturday at 12:45 p.m., Sunday at 9:30 and Monday at 10:30 trace Dr. Martin Luther King’s major speeches in San Francisco and how the Birmingham bombings accelerated the United San […]

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Poetry in Politics

The California adoption of the 13th Amendment has the signature of every member of the State Senate and Assembly in 1865. It had been the first change to the Constitution since 1804.  Even the California legislators who voted against the resolution knew it was the most important vote they would ever cast. In that same […]

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Angelou was a freedom conductor

“The first woman I ever saw wearing African garb was Maya Angelou,” said Rev. Cecil Williams, from the glass pulpit which he had shared with Angelou more than 100 times over the past 50 years. “She’s the reason I began wearing a dashiki and having the robes with kente cloth,” underscoring how fundamentally she had […]

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A call for social justice

Synod of Pacific will convey to attorneys general, federal and state banking regulators and banking leaders in California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington its wish that mortgage modifications be completed by October 2015, seven years after the financial crisis, referencing a scorecard completed by the Interfaith Council on Corporate Responsibility. Eighteen percent of mortgages are […]

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Raymond H. Boone

When I began working for Ray Boone as a reporter at the Richmond AFRO-AMERICAN and Richmond Planet in 1977, I quickly came to the conclusion that he intended to destroy every ounce of self-confidence I had. Cockiness defined me coming in the door. I had been the AFRO’s White House and Capitol Hill reporter, worked […]

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A Love Supreme

E.W. Wainwright, Fred Harris and Archbishop Franzo King in an extended rendition of A Love Supreme at St. John Coltrane African Orthodox Church in San Francisco. Wainwright sat in on drums to celebrate his 75th birthday with Harris, a collaborator for 20 years. During my brief remarks, I noted that Benjamin Franklin “Reb” Spikes made […]

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The fixes instead of the fixers

In my favorite TV show, Kerry Washington’s Olivia Pope breaks into hysterical laughter upon learning that practically everyone around her is a murderer, including her own mother and father. “What’s the point?” she exclaimed on ABC’s Scandal. In San Francisco’s real life version, yesterdays Chronicle asked how a former bank teller became president of the […]

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Auto Row 50 anniversary premieres documentary April 11

The premiere of the ReUNION: Education-Arts-Heritage documentary The African-American Freedom Trail marks the 50th anniversary of the Auto Row demonstrations which changed American industry for a generation by opening up the Big Three automakers to fair employment and dealership practices. it screens on Friday, April 11 at 4 p.m. in the Black Coalition on AIDS, […]

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Trail gives new sense of belonging

In an initiative to demonstrate the civic, economic and personal benefits of restoring a sense of belonging for African-Americans — 100,000 strong in San Francisco from the 1950s through the 1980s, ReUNION: Education-Arts-Heritage has reached a three year agreement to present the African-American Freedom Trail to the 16 million visitors to San Francisco through the […]

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Three generations of champions

I didn’t know that Earle Booker won the intercollegiate boxing title nationally as a student at the University of San Francisco and was headed to the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936 except for an untimely eye injury–until I met his son Ian Booker. It was just another example of the overlooked history we show in […]

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Brew and Que

Since 1973, Everett and Jones has been a Bay Area institution for its barbecue, but it also has.been a pioneer in craft brewing with its Saucy Sista Ale. Check it out on the last weekend of Black Food Month along with hundreds of other venues in Say Grace and Wipe Yo Hands: BlackRestaurant.Net’s Guide to […]

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Food connects America and Africa

Craves restaurant in Charleston is a good place to begin recognizing the centrality of African-American food to American culture.  The Low Country cuisine is a direct retention of African culture. Author John William Templeton starts there in Say Grace and Wipe Yo’ Hands: The BlackRestaurant.NET Guide to America’s Black Restaurants.    To underscore his theme, he […]

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In Jet on the 4th of July

Greg and Karen Johnson unearthed this 1983 article and photo on the centennial of the country’s oldest black newspaper when I was editor of the Richmond AFRO-AMERICAN and the Richmond Planet. Looking at the whole issue, I found myself fascinated by what else was happening: Michael Jackson releasing Billie Jean, Stevie Wonder at a new […]

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Collard greens pesto and andouille sausage

Gussie’s Chicken and Waffles owner and chef Michelle Wilson offered her latest creation–collard greens pesto–during the Love and Basketball festival at Ella Hill Hutch Center Saturday. A long-time supporter of National Black Business Month, she’s forged in daring new directions with African-American cuisine.  Like jazz, its attributes blend with many other traditions. London native David […]

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Empower your students, educators with Calafia in the Classroom

Calafia in the Classroom gives the power-packed pioneers of the Golden State direct access to growing minds by placing the award-winning anthology Our Roots Run Deep: the Black Experience in California, Vols. 1-4 in every classroom in the state. There is a movement afoot to create an African-American Freedom Trail across California to reflect the […]

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Teenager’s courage a century apart defined San Francisco’s civil rights impact

Tamam Tracy Moncur was just months away from graduating from Berkeley High School.  But when she summoned 2,000 demonstrators to sit-in at the Palace Hotel, she rocked the city’s establishment.     The scenes of police carrying students out of the venerable establishment caused Mayor John Shelley to call all 37 of the city’s major […]

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Black American Day honors first American to die for the country

The California legislature created Black American Day on March 5 to honor Crispus Attucks as the first American to die for the country and to require every classroom in the state to focus on the contributions of African-Americans to American history. The education holiday actually predates the creation of Black History Month in the mid-1970s, […]

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Talking jazz in Utah

Salt Lake City and San Francisco are usually presented as polar opposites but across the street from the Mormon Temple Friday an audience was enthralled learning about San Francisco’s African American musical heritage. Today we continue that discussion in Fisherman’s Wharf at 11 am in the Visitor Center Theater of the San Francisco Maritime National […]

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Leidesdorff statue stopping passersby

The newly completed statue of Capt. William Alexander Leidesdorff is capturing the attention of many, reports the company which installed the artwork in San Francisco’s Financial District.   Megha Rajput, executive assistant at Clinton Reilly Holdings, said many people stop to ask questions about the engraved inscription which lists the many accomplishments of the sailor-merchant-diplomat-legislator who […]

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The most important event in African-American history

Enlist in our War on Ignorance this week leading up to Juneteenth with the definitive account of the most important event in African-American history, the ratification of the 13th Amendment; the comprehensive directory to the $6 billion African-American food industry and the African-American economic plan to double our income over the next five years at californiablackhistory.com

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