Black American Day honors first American to die for the country

Langston Hughes spent time in San Francisco with patron Noel Sullivan in the mid-1930s, engaging with major entertainers and the labor movement.
Langston Hughes spent time in San Francisco with patron Noel Sullivan in the mid-1930s, engaging with major entertainers and the labor movement.

The California legislature created Black American Day on March 5 to honor Crispus Attucks as the first American to die for the country and to require every classroom in the state to focus on the contributions of African-Americans to American history.
The education holiday actually predates the creation of Black History Month in the mid-1970s, but is little known and rarely put into effect.
Come to the Water: Teaching San Francisco Black History continues its seven week course on Wednesday, March 5 with a discussion of the industrial period of the African-American freedom movement in San Francisco from 1929 to 1960.
A number of international figures got significant boosts to their stature in San Francisco during that period, including A. Philip Randolph, Dr. Howard Thurman, Langston Hughes and local youth like Bill Russell and K.C. Jones, Burl Toler and Ollie Matson, Maya Angelou and Johnny Mathis.
The African-American Freedom Trail is a powerful tool for illustrating the scope of that history.
Learn more about the period at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, in the Visitor Center Theater of the San Francisco Maritime National Historical
Park, 499 Jefferson St.
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